Thanksgiving: The American Tradition

Here in the U.K. we typically reserve our turkeys for Christmas Day. However, our American cousin’s like to indulge in this very special meat a little bit earlier than we do.

We are, of course, talking about Thanksgiving. It is believed to have been a coming together of European Immigrants and Native Americans, giving thanks to the land they had settled on and the harvest they had reaped. Pilgrims also don’t celebrate Christmas, which made the annual traditional their largest celebration of the year. Traditionally, it is observed on the last Thursday of November, allowing for a period of calm before Christmas.

The great feast is believed to have lasted for three whole days. Therefore, is it any wonder turkey is the meat of choice?! We know our leftovers last for days.

In modern times, it is believed that Americans eat more food on the day of Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year. Typical meals include mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and various seasonal vegetables to accompany the turkey. It isn’t too dissimilar from our traditional Christmas dinner, except for all of the food is native to the Americas. A popular recent addition to a typical Thanksgiving meal is green bean casserole. Created in the 1950’s by food company, Campbell’s, it is now a modern classic.

Much like our Christmas dinner, those celebrating Thanksgiving have traditional deserts also. Utilising the best of the harvest, popular sweet dishes include pumpkin pie and pecan pies. The sweet spices added to these pies have made them incredibly favourable and have even inspired one of the most sought after drinks of the season: pumpkin spiced lattes. This is a trend which has crossed the pond and we too cannot get enough of them!

What are you thankful for this year? We’re incredibly appreciative of our happy, healthy turkeys! Let us known over on Facebook and Twitter.

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